Fistful of Gamma Rays
Sometimes a good vent is what’s needed. Sorry your day sucked.
Stupid days are stupid, internet hugs for you

Thanks, guys. I appreciate it. <3

I sincerely regret having gotten up today.

赵孟頫行草书法 《归去来兮辞》

Chinese cursive script calligraphy by Zhao Mengfu (Yuan Dynasty)

Hooray for the return of Internet and MATLAB. :)

MATLAB is pretty great. Going to have to take the time to learn it systematically someday.

Starfinder, Part 4

Internet’s back for now! (Thanks janie!) So I can run my mouth about my hobbies on the internet some more.

Finally got a chance to mess around with this in MATLAB. To recap, I’ve got a magnetometer that I need to calibrate. In a perfect world with a perfectly calibrated magnetometer, you should be able to move it all around in random orientations and get a set of points that, when graphed in three axes, form a sphere centered on the origin. Normally, however, what you get is more of an ellipsoid somewhere out in no man’s land.

Like that. (I got this dataset by the very scientific method of shaking my breadboard around while taking readings.) You can see it’s nowhere near the center. It’s also nowhere near spherical. This picture shows it a little better.

So I need to take this thing and move it onto the center, rotate it to align its axes with the coordinate axes, scale it onto a sphere, and derotate it. (The reason to rotate and then derotate is to get a set of scaling factors you can apply after calibration without going through all this mess to do it.)

Calculating the offsets I need to get this centered is pretty easy.

x_off = (xmax - xmin)/2 - xmax

Same deal for y and z axes.

I then found the major axis of the ellipsoid by calculating the magnitude of the vector to each point and finding the maximum of these. Rotating it to align with the x-axis is a little trickier. There are lots of ways to do this, but many of them are fairly computationally heavy. I wound up following the method outlined here, which is fairly simple.

Once I had the ellipsoid’s major axis lined up on the x-axis, I then found the largest axis in the y-z plane by finding the largest radius in those two dimensions. I then rotated again to line this up with the y-axis.

From here I calculated scaling factors in each axis to map the ellipsoid onto a sphere. I didn’t derotate in MATLAB, but it would done by multiplying by the inverse of the rotation matrices I already applied. Here’s what I got.

Way better.

There’s almost certainly a better way to do this, and I suspect I’ll find things I missed here, but for now this is a good first step. Next to translate into some code an Arduino can handle.

MATLAB code under the cut. (Again, there’s likely a much better way to do this - rotation matrices aren’t an area I’ve dealt with much. MATLAB is also something I’m not anything like an expert in.)

Read More

Aw, man. Internet’s out. Banished to Tumblr mobile.

this-is-high:

Lost Underwater Lion City: Rediscovery of China’s ‘Atlantis

Qiandao Lake is a man-made lake located in Chun’an County, China, where archeologists have discovered in 2001 ruins of an underwater city. The city is at a depth of 26-40 meters and was named “Lion City”. There would have been 290,000 people living in this city during more than 1300 years.

thelandofmaps:

Mercator projection of the moon [300x299]CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

thelandofmaps:

Mercator projection of the moon [300x299]
CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!
thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

A Leidenfrost droplet impregnated with hydrophilic beads hovers on a thin film of its own vapor. The Leidenfrost effect occurs when a liquid touches a solid surface much, much hotter than its boiling point. Instead of boiling entirely away, part of the liquid vaporizes and the remaining liquid survives for extended periods while the vapor layer insulates it from the hot surface. Hydrophilic beads inserted into Leidenfrost water droplets initially sink and are completely enveloped by the liquid. But, as the drop evaporates, the beads self-organize, forming a monolayer that coats the surface of the drop. The outer surface of the beads drys out, trapping the beads and causing the evaporation rate to slow because less liquid is exposed. (Photo credit: L. Maquet et al.; research paper - pdf)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

A Leidenfrost droplet impregnated with hydrophilic beads hovers on a thin film of its own vapor. The Leidenfrost effect occurs when a liquid touches a solid surface much, much hotter than its boiling point. Instead of boiling entirely away, part of the liquid vaporizes and the remaining liquid survives for extended periods while the vapor layer insulates it from the hot surface. Hydrophilic beads inserted into Leidenfrost water droplets initially sink and are completely enveloped by the liquid. But, as the drop evaporates, the beads self-organize, forming a monolayer that coats the surface of the drop. The outer surface of the beads drys out, trapping the beads and causing the evaporation rate to slow because less liquid is exposed. (Photo credit: L. Maquet et al.; research paper - pdf)